John Fyfe-Millar

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Political Orientation

LeftRight

Position: Ward 13 Councillor

Incumbent:  No

Previous council experience: No

Occupation / Profession: Business owner / manager

Transit: “Transit has been brought to the forefront of municipal conversations in London which is a great thing. The simple statement is that we need and deserve better transit in the city of London. Transit has been grossly underfunded, and we need to put a stronger emphasis on creating a better experience. Currently I do not back the BRT plan as it is presented. While there are some good items to implement in the current plan, the reality is that we do not have a handle on costs associated with implementation and operating costs.” [1]Excerpt from Electipedia.ca survey response.

Social Housing: “As I walk through Ward 13, there is an abundance of property that could be rented out as affordable space for families and individuals. The important factor is updating those properties to code, and ensure they represent quality housing for people. We can do that through incentives for people to get properties to code, and rent them out as geared to income alternatives. As with any housing there comes the importance of respect for your neighbours. For people who neither respect their neighbours or choose to disrupt through illegal means such as dealing, we need to be prepared to work quickly to ensure that the greater community is protected.” [2]Excerpt from Electipedia.ca survey response.

Business Climate: “Business is the backbone of any city. London has ample space and opportunity for business to thrive and grow. We need to engage people to commit a move forward, and ensure City Hall is a catalyst, not a hinderance. That would include serviced industrial land outside the core, while continuing to focus on the commitment to locate large corporate and commercial in the downtown. It should ensure properties that can be redeveloped and repurposed are done through bureaucratic assistance. London can be a leader in food manufacturing, education, healthcare and many other fields. We are the most affordable major centres in Ontario, so we need to ask why are we not attracting more business. Ask the hard questions, and adjust to become a business leader and hub in Southwestern Ontario.” [3]Excerpt from Electipedia.ca survey response.

Fiscal Responsibility: “A large concern on multi year budgeting is an increase that becomes the new 0%. Each and every year, we have had budget increases due to unforeseen circumstances. I would be happy with a four year budget under the rate of inflation, that can be topped up on an annual basis not to exceed the rate of inflation. We can never lose sight of the fact that deficits are picked up by future generations, and while not avoidable should never become the norm for any municipality. Everything gets paid back some day.” [4]Excerpt from Electipedia.ca survey response.

Safe Injection Sites: “There is no misunderstanding that we need to do something. That said, this is not just a downtown issue, Ward 13 issue or London issue. This is a much larger issue that not only deals with London but surrounding municipalities. First, we must get our regional partners together and work towards a common goal that can mitigate issues, and come up with a regional plan for this. While I back mobile sites 100%, it is unfortunate that we cannot have them without a permanent site. That said, wherever a permanent site is located, there must be commitments to the community as a whole. A site can not and should not have any negative impacts on the community.” [5]Excerpt from Electipedia.ca survey response.

Other: “Infrastructure is not sexy, but necessary. Today, we are seeing the fallout of our aging infrastructure, and we must be prepared to invest in it. Still, as we focus on the health of our city, we must also ensure that it is vibrant, and attractive to investment. We have a city that is affordable, with opportunity to grow in ways that others cannot.” [6]Excerpt from Electipedia.ca survey response.

References   [ + ]

Electipedia Survey Response

This candidate responded to Electipedia's survey. Read the candidate's reponses below:

NameJohn Fyfe-Millar
How would you describe your political outlook?Centre
Do you currently belong to a political party at the federal or provincial level?No
Have you previously been a member of a political party at the federal or provincial level?No
Instructions

For the following, please select one option that best indicates how each statement reflects your position or philosophy:

Social assistance payments should never be tied to mandated work or education requirements.Somewhat Agree
Fiscal prudence is the hallmark of sound governance.Somewhat Agree
All public servants should be prohibited from going on strike.Somewhat Disagree
Fees for using vehicles at certain times in high traffic zones is a reasonable way to subsidize and encourage the use of public transit.Strongly Disagree
Climate change represents an imminent threat that should be addressed by governments at every level.Strongly Agree
Oil pipelines are an effective way to boost Canada’s economy and energy self-sufficiency.Somewhat Agree
While environmental concerns are important, government’s first priority is to build infrastructure that is safe and cost effective.Somewhat Agree
Spending on social programs is more effective than spending on law enforcement and jails.Somewhat Agree
Borrowing by governments, if done responsibly, is necessary to meet the needs of citizens.Somewhat Agree
Mandatory minimum sentences for criminal convictions are needed to ensure equality before the law, and to act as a deterrent.Somewhat Disagree
Safe injection sites are necessary to protect the most vulnerable members of our society.Strongly Agree
Instructions

Please provide a one-paragraph response outlining your position on each of the issues indicated. Keeping mind that a) your answers will be publicly available, b) answers may be lightly edited for spelling, grammar, clarity, or length and c) while subsequent amendments to answers may be considered, the original response will remain visible to the public:

Transit

Transit has been brought to the forefront of municipal conversations in London which is a great thing. The simple statement is that we need and deserve better transit in the city of London. Transit has been grossly underfunded, and we need to put a stronger emphasis on creating a better experience. Currently I do not back the BRT plan as it is presented. While there are some good items to implement in the current plan, the reality is that we do not have a handle on costs associated with implementation and operating costs. The other challenge I see is that we are looking to current ridership and asking them to wait 10 years to see real change, when we could be investing today for better service tomorrow. Dedicated bus lanes have been around for well over fifty years, and London is calling them our revolutionary change for 2025. There are other concerns with the north south corridor, Western and projected ridership. I believe we can do better.

Environment

London needs to deal with some basics that will have sold impacts before we move onto greener pastures. First, we must find a way to ensure we are not dumping raw sewage into the Thames river. Where possible, we need to put funding into municipal properties that are struggling to be energy efficient, and retrofit them to today's standards. We continue to work on tree coverage, but we must be ever vigilant to ensure that trees that are being planted are maintained and nurtured through a well thought out process. Our transit system can be electrified starting today, and we should be committing to replacing our buses over time with an electric option. While we are continuing to have a discussion on green bins, it would be great if we could actually do a recycling program in the Downtown core. Right now, for many there recycling is simply going into landfill. Lastly, create a corporate incentive program for business that commits to reducing their carbon footprint in measurable ways.

Social Housing

London has a serious problem with social housing. One large concern is safe housing, which to me is key to any housing program. Residents deserve the same quality of safety as all others in the city, and for organizations to represent housing, they must be held to that standard. As I walk through Ward 13, there is an abundance of property that could be rented out as affordable space for families and individuals. The important factor is updating those properties to code, and ensure they represent quality housing for people. We can do that through incentives for people to get properties to code, and rent them out as geared to income alternatives. As with any housing there comes the importance of respect for your neighbours. For people who neither respect their neighbours or choose to disrupt through illegal means such as dealing, we need to be prepared to work quickly to ensure that the greater community is protected.

Business Climate

Business is the backbone of any city. London has ample space and opportunity for business to thrive and grow. We need to engage people to commit a move forward, and ensure City Hall is a catalyst, not a hinderance. That would include serviced industrial land outside the core, while continuing to focus on the commitment to locate large corporate and commercial in the downtown. It should ensure properties that can be redeveloped and repurposed are done through bureaucratic assistance. London can be a leader in food manufacturing, education, healthcare and many other fields. We are the most affordable major centres in Ontario, so we need to ask why are we not attracting more business. Ask the hard questions, and adjust to become a business leader and hub in Southwestern Ontario.

Fiscal Responsibility

It is imperative that the city remain fiscally responsible. To simply say to taxpayers "don't worry about it", when it comes to policy is at the very best insulting to the residents whose hard earned income is what municipal government (or any government) survives on. A large concern on multi year budgeting is an increase that becomes the new 0%. Each and every year, we have had budget increases due to unforeseen circumstances. I would be happy with a four year budget under the rate of inflation, that can be topped up on an annual basis not to exceed the rate of inflation. We can never lose sight of the fact that deficits are picked up by future generations, and while not avoidable should never become the norm for any municipality. Everything gets paid back some day.

Law and Order

The police budget is a healthy part of the total budget for the city of London. That said, we need to focus in on solutions that will give the LPD more options to remove front lines officers from administrative duties. It is imperative that our police are on the streets working to keep our city safe. They have taken on roles of social workers, councillors and health care professionals to fill gaps that would be better served by professionals who are trained specifically in those fields. One of the luxuries we have in London is that many of us will never require an officer to pull a weapon for us. Yet, their job is increasingly difficult dealing with domestic issues, human trafficking, and addiction. We have to be wary about what our officers deal with on a daily basis, and ensure there are ways for them to continue to be effective in an ever changing environment.

Safe Injection Sites

There is no misunderstanding that we need to do something. That said, this is not just a downtown issue, Ward 13 issue or London issue. This is a much larger issue that not only deals with London but surrounding municipalities. First, we must get our regional partners together and work towards a common goal that can mitigate issues, and come up with a regional plan for this. While I back mobile sites 100%, it is unfortunate that we cannot have them without a permanent site. That said, wherever a permanent site is located, there must be commitments to the community as a whole. A site can not and should not have any negative impacts on the community. Simply put, a SIS has nothing to do with NIMBY because there is no community that has stepped up and requested to have it in their backyard. Again, those who are running any such site must be prepared to deal with the negative fall out should it occur.

Other Issues

Infrastructure is not sexy, but necessary. Today, we are seeing the fallout of our aging infrastructure, and we must be prepared to invest in it. Still, as we focus on the health of our city, we must also ensure that it is vibrant, and attractive to investment. We have a city that is affordable, with opportunity to grow in ways that others cannot. We have an abundance of natural wonders that create a dynamic landscape to showcase. Geographically, we are situated perfectly as a hub for companies in the US and larger urban centres. We are a city of opportunity. Simply put, we just need to do better.

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